First Lines Fridays #2

First Lines Fridays is a weekly feature for book lovers hosted by Wandering Words. What if instead of judging a book by its cover, its author or its prestige, we judged it by its opening lines?  If you want to make your own post, feel free to use or edit the banner above, and follow the rules below:

  • Pick a book off your shelf (it could be your current read or on your TBR) and open to the first page
  • Copy the first few lines, but don’t give anything else about the book away just yet – you need to hook the reader first
  • Finally… reveal the book!

If you’re using Twitter, don’t forget to use #FirstLinesFridays!


Happy October everyone!

It warms my heart to start the month with a book off my shelf. I was helping a friend de-clutter and organize his home after a move. He gave me a few things and a few books! The author of this particular book has been recommended to me three times by three different men in my life. It’s funny how as much as I seem to try to avoid it, it comes back into my life in the most peculiar way.

I take this as a sign that it’s subtly imploring and encouraging me, “PLEASE READ ME…at least before you die!” So… now it’s on my nightstand in a beautifully leather-bounded volume. This particular edition is a beautiful hunter green hardcover with gold embossed Celtic knots spaced out within a chevron pattern.


FIRST LINES:

“In the country of Westphalia, in the castle of the most noble Baron of Thunder-ten-tronckh, lived a youth whom Nature had endowed with a most sweet disposition. His face was the true index of his mind. He had a solid judgement joined to the most unaffected simplicity; and hence, I presume, he had his name of Candide.

The old servants of the house suspected him to have been the son of the Baron’s sister, by a very good sort of a gentleman of the neighborhood, whom that young lady refused to marry,, because he could produce no more than threescore and eleven quarterings in his arms; the rest of the genealogical tree belonging to the family having been lost through the injuries of time.


HINTS:

The author was a deist, a strong proponent of religious freedom, and a critic of tyrannical governments.
The title of the book is within the first lines I’ve shared.
The author combines wit with a parody of the classic adventure-romance plot

The title of the book is…

Description:

Voltaire’s satire of eighteenth-century Europe, hailed as one of the most influential works in the Western canon

“Candide” is Voltaire’s most famous work, a satirical masterpiece, which was first published in 1759. It is the story of its central character, the titular Candide, who lives a sheltered comfortable life and has been indoctrinated into the philosophy of Leibnizian optimism, by his mentor, Professor Pangloss. When Candide travels throughout the world he begins to witness the pervasive hardships of life, an experience that leads to his ultimate disillusionment with Leibnizian philosophy.

Through this clever narrative Voltaire refutes the philosophy of Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz, whose central idea was that despite the apparent imperfections of the world, it was the best of all possible worlds because it was created by an all powerful and all knowing God. Voltaire found this philosophy insultingly ridiculous and within the humorous and satirical construct of this work he effectively exposes the idiocy of a philosophy that was so pervasive in his time.

“Candide” is a fast-moving and fantastical tale which established Voltaire as not only one of the most important but controversial authors of his time. This edition is illustrated by Adrien Moreau and includes introductions by Philip Littell and J. M. Wheeler.

LINKS: GoodReads | Amazon | Alma Classics | Barnes & Nobles | IndieBound | Book Shop

5 Comments Add yours

  1. That was amazing!! I loved reading this

    Liked by 1 person

    1. theresaly520 says:

      I’m glad that you enjoyed it!!😊 Voltaire holds a special place on my shelf! Have a wonderful Thanksgiving!!🍁🍂🌠

      Like

  2. Ha! I guessed right, my memory serves me well. It’s something I read in my undergraduate degree. 😊❤️

    Liked by 1 person

    1. theresaly520 says:

      Wow! A classic indeed! 💖Happy Thanksgiving Jenna!!🌾🍂🍁🌠

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Happy Thanksgiving! 😊 ❤️

        Like

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